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Tokens of Remembrance: Indigenous Faces in Edmonton’s Beaux Arts Architecture, 1907-1930

Cole Hawkins

Disclaimer: Due to the importance around the legal designation of Indian status, this article sometimes uses the term “Indian” to…

Louise Umphreville: The Shining Star

Jenna Chalifoux

In August  of 1782, Fort York was captured by the French. Edward Umphreville and some other HBC men were taken by…

Daughters of Shining Star

Jenna Chalifoux

There are many notable women in Edmonton’s history books. The ‘Famous Five’ may come to mind straight away, in addition to…

Once a Teacher, Always a Teacher

Jeannette Austin-Odina

My journey towards becoming an educator started in my childhood with time spent under a mango tree at my home…

Edmonton’s Caribbean Journey

Donna Coombs-Montrose

The flights touched down at a Canadian International Airport bringing scores of eager Caribbean nationals, their suitcases packed with their…

Vivacious Caribbean Teachers

Etty Shaw-Cameron

During the 1960s, school jurisdictions in Alberta advertised for teachers in leading newspapers and at teacher training colleges in the…

Arrivals in Late 1800s

Dr. Jennifer Kelly

Initially, African-Canadians made their way to the North-West Territories as individual pioneers or accompanying traders. Most were attempting to make a living from the fur trade and found employment with companies such as the Hudson’s Bay Company.

Place Renaming in Edmonton: A Constant in the City’s History

Connor Thompson

Renaming places in Edmonton has become a major point of public discussion with several renamings occurring, or being proposed, since…

Sam the Shoemaker: Cobbling Together Community

Harma-Mae Smit

It was the turbulent sixties. In the United States and Canada, teenage unrest was making headlines. Even in the small…

Alberta’s Early Black Settlements

Dr. Jennifer Kelly

Many Black immigrants who came to Alberta as family groups in the early 1900s had previously lived in Oklahoma Territory alongside the Five Civilized Tribes (Cherokee, Creek, Seminole, Chickasaw, Choctaw). Following the creation of the state in 1907, Black residents faced increased levels of discrimination through segregation laws and voter disenfranchisement.

Social Exclusion

Dr. Jennifer Kelly

In the early 1900s, Black pioneers in Alberta often saw themselves as proud Canadian citizens and British subjects. However, they faced and fought exclusion from several aspects of Canadian life ranging from serving in the Canadian Expeditionary Forces to local theatres to swimming pools and access to housing.

“Our Negro Citizens” Newspaper Columns

Dr. Jennifer Kelly

“Our Negro Citizens” (ONC) was a weekly column in the Edmonton Journal and Edmonton Bulletin in the early 1920s. It was written by Reverend Geo. W. Slater Jr., pastor of the Emmanuel African Methodist Episcopal (EAME) church in Edmonton.